Return to Home Page

November 26, 2012

“Secret” spots the hot new travel trend?

Top secret stamp.

Top secret stamp. Photo: Mike Licht / Flickr

You’ve got a favorite restaurant that few people know about. Or it’s a cool location with a view that’s only meant for the locals. It’s fun to have secrets. CNN had this article: The rise of ‘secret tourism.’

The story talks about event organizers who build anticipation and unique experiences by keeping visitors in the dark until the last possible moment. In a way, it harkens back to the pre-Internet ways of travel: where you were never sure what you’d see when you arrived on the other side. Today’s world of the Internet, social networks and information overload can diminish the mystique of going abroad.

If you’re on the inside, exclusivity is fun: it makes you feel cool and in-the-know. For those who think the experiences in the CNN story are too manufactured, here’s a similar piece about underground bars and clubs in Japan: Hidden Tokyo. Now that’s a city I could live in for years and still not find all the awesome venues.

One of my favorite secret spots was a bar/restaurant in Taipei, Taiwan called People Restaurant (a.k.a. Shintori Restaurant). The branch I went to was down a set of stairs between two banks. Only people who knew it was there would find the place. Not a place where pedestrains would stumble across it. There is a big wooden door and no sign. The secret: stick your hand into a stone lantern, then the door will slide open. Inside, is a sleek, fashionable hangout. The drinks come in kooky, weirdly-shaped glasses. The popular item with groups were the “test tube” shots. A bowl of alcohol shots in little glasses that looked like test tubes. People Restaurant was my top spot to take visitors.

Do you have favorite secret spots? Please describe them in the comments.

Posted by | Comments (0) 
Category: Food and Drink, Notes from the collective travel mind

Leave a Reply

Main

Bio

Books

Stories

Essays

Video

Interviews

Events

Writers

Marco

Paris

Vagabonding.net

Contact


Vagabonding Audio Book at Audible.com

Marco Polo Didnt Go There
Rolf's new book!


Vagabonding
   Vagabonding

RECENT COMMENTS

Roger: Without a doubt, travel should broaden your belief system. If it doesn’t,...

Rolf Potts: Good stuff, Barbara — thanks. Several of these apps were new to me.

Michelle Anderson: Great post and it’s a frequent question I’m asked as...

Pauline: Thank you so much for this. I am off on my first solo trip in May and this...

Pauline: Thank you so much for this. I am off on my first solo trip in Map and this...

Julia Wright: Barbara thank you for being the helpful person you are. The world needs...

Kathryn: Wow, I hope someone explained to the guy with the speaker that you can these...

Caroline: Thanks for the comment, Roger! Yes I agree, these kinds of incidents usually...

Andy: I know him personally, and he is NOT Rod Stewart, he’s actually a therapist...

Roger: Very good post Caroline. I can remember several automotive...

SPONSORED BY :



CATEGORIES

TRAVEL LINKS

ARCHIVES

RECENT ENTRIES

Foreign news should offer us a means by which to humanize the Other
Lessons learned on the road vs. lessons learned in school
Must-have smart phone travel apps
People from cultures that prize individualism tend to misapprehend cultures that don’t
Mister Universe
Vagabonding Case Study: Nellie Huang
Especially the disasters are worth it
The secret of travel is to approximate the life of a local
A day spent wandering a city never gets old
Vagabonding Field Report: Exploring the vastness of Rome


Subscribe to this blog's feed
Follow @rolfpotts