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October 25, 2012

When going back home, take it as a holiday

picture credit: Flickr/ Metrix X

The only way to survive a 10 months post travel blues was fairly simple to me: I took it as a holiday.

Seriously. You may not have seen your folks and friends for several years, but this should not be a reason to freak out. The same goes for your friends; because pretty much, nothing has changed substantially. Except, possibly, yourself.

Yourself and not much else. You will see your town/city still busy with those same old deeds… the smell will be the same. Your place, luckily, will not have changed that much too. Most certainly, it won’t. And when we get to realize that the only person who actually made a pro -or a re- gress is just ourselves, relaxing and letting it flow past slowly, savoring it as a vacation from our own travelling, really feels good.

So, what are some of the things you may do to make it look like a real holiday?

Take it easy
And this has to be stressed completely: you are back home, the travel burden is over. Just kick back, grab that book you turned down for the past three weeks for a guidebook, turn on some nice music, and just do what you should at home: relax, unwind.

Catch up with old friends
As much as you are curious to know what happened while you were away, most of your friends will be extremely happy to hear some of your travel stories. And this does feel good, and can turn boring afternoons or evenings into mundane events. Accept that coffee invitation, make some phone calls, post on your Facebook wall that you are back and willing to see your old pals. You will get some positive vibes, making your stay at home even more of a nice holiday J

Organize a return dinner
This may sound biased and simple, but there are fewer other occasions than dinners to really get together and catch up with people. And talk. And gossip! If you have the energy to cook a simple past dish and invite 5 or 6 friends over, you will save a bunch of time and will have a very good one, indeed.

Your parents are there, too
And they probably have been waiting for you more than anybody else, following your trip on a world map they would check each time they got an e-mail from YOU, the travelling son/daughter in a distant, unknown, far away land. Parents are great and can help ease your transition from the travel world to the real one… and if you live with them or need to be with them for a while as you look for a new place, exploit this time together to do anything you feel would make them happy.

Organize a slideshow of your pictures and lecture your friends about your trip. You will not only enjoy some good moments of attention, but you may become the inspiration for some to actually get out and do what you have done successfully. Sometimes, this is all what it takes to encourage others to take life changing decisions… and if you feel as great and empowered from your trip as I think you do, what a better way than help your friends improve themselves?

Do you have any experiences returning home after an extended trip? Do you have any other worthwhile suggestions to ease the transition back into the ordinary world? Please comment below.

Posted by | Comments (1) 
Category: Notes from the collective travel mind, Vagabonding Advice, Vagabonding Life


One Response to “When going back home, take it as a holiday”

  1. john Says:

    where’s that photo taken? looks cool

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