July 18, 2014

Vagabonding Case Study: Denise Diamond

Denise Diamond

kids

adiamondabroad.com

Age: 36

Hometown: Texas

Quote: Be more awesome and do the things you’ve only been talking about doing until now. (more…)

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Category: General, Vagabonding Case Studies

July 16, 2014

Vagabonding Case Study: Christine Kaaloa

unnamed (1)

Christine Kaaloa

 grrrltraveler.com

youtube.com/ckaaloa

Age: Never ask a girl her age after she crosses 40.

Hometown: Aiea, Hawaii

Quote: Your horizon is only as far as you can imagine it. (more…)

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Category: Vagabonding Case Studies

July 13, 2014

Lessons from a tour guide, part I

This week I returned from a month and a half overseas working as a tour guide, helping to lead two different groups on an epic Best-of-Europe grand tour. The experience was a new one for me; after years of exploring the continent’s cobbled backstreets and ancient cities as a solo travel writer, I found myself with the unique opportunity of being a guide for one of America’s most well-respected touring companies.

plane image for blog

A couple of concerns dogged me as I flew over the Arctic Circle, the plane making its slow path from my home base of Seattle to the tour departure point of Amsterdam. Questions like, how would I be able to handle a large group as we steam across the continent day in and day out? And, how will the mechanics of moving groups from one site to the other in an efficient way work? But these concerns paled next to the most significant challenge: Helping the scores of American travelers connect to the history and culture of the places they came so far to experience.

Staring out my window at the endless expanse of the north Atlantic, I began to feel the weight of the responsibility settle into my gut. How do I curate this experience for our flock? I’d always done it for myself just fine; teaching others how to appreciate the richness of Europe was something I’d never needed to do beyond my writing. It was easy enough to crank out articles about the places I’d visited and about the treasures—the food, the history, the people, all the things that make up the culture—those places had to offer. Would I be able to help our travelers connect to them and appreciate them in the same way that I did?

A final goodbye to the group near the Eiffel Tower at dusk.

A final goodbye to the group near the Eiffel Tower at dusk.

The teaching I’d done before—giving free travel talks at public libraries to would-be travelers who were interested in learning how to create their own independent European adventure—was indispensable. The classes I’d taught had given me a sense of what tickled a traveler’s fancy and what common-sense issues they worried about. This gave me the advantage of being able to anticipate questions and concerns, sometime before the group members even knew they had them.

The true challenge was facilitating the tour member’s experience of the culture. It was in trying to cast new food experiences as a part of good travel, as “sightseeing for your palate”. It was in helping them fend off museum overload by urging them to see the art of the Louvre and the Accademia with their hearts rather than their mind. It was in not rushing through another “check the box” locale (don’t rush through St. Mark’s square, I counseled, just take your time and find your own way to relate to the space). And it was in fending off cathedral overload by teaching that architecture was art we walk through—art that took generations of devoted believers and craftsman to create—rather than just another drafty old building.

Helping the group appreciate the elegant, historic decay of Venice is a challenge when the city is crowded and hot.

venice 1

Finally I kept the old teacher’s maxim close to my heart: “The task of the teacher is to honor the integrity of fact while at the same time igniting the student’s imagination.”

Over the course of the following weeks I’d work on striking that balance, always trying to bring long-ago stories and long-dead people to Technicolor life. Success for the tour guide also means the tourists returning home knowing that the struggles, the tragedies and triumphs of those who inhabited the majestic castles and cobbled city streets so long ago set the stage for the world as we know it today.

The trick to achieving that was helping them forge an emotional connection to the events a given site had witnessed; that its history was not just a collection of faceless dates and facts, but human beings with hopes and dreams who lived in similarly dramatic times of war, economic uncertainty and dramatic social change. Those folks tried to make the best of it, and somehow got through it. We can too. But more than just the appreciation of history, it’s the appreciation of the culture that really informs a successful travel experience. My hope is that the tour members came away with a renewed perspective on how Europe’s endlessly varied tapestry of cultures, while wonderfully diverse, are similar to our own in the most fundamentally human ways.

If you ever find yourself in the trying but satisfying role as tour guide, I think you’ll find that those lessons are your tour members’ best souvenirs.

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Category: Europe, Languages and Culture, Notes from the collective travel mind, On The Road, Travel Writing, Vagabonding Case Studies, Vagabonding Life

July 4, 2014

Vagabonding Case Study: Luke McGuire Armstrong

Luke Guatemala

Luke Maguire Armstrong

LukeSpartacus.com

Age: 28

Hometown: Kalispel, Montana

Quote: Hundreds of years from now, it will not matter what my bank account was, the sort of house I lived in, or the kind of car I drove… But the world may be different because I did something so bafflingly crazy that my ruins become a tourist attraction. - Demotivators (more…)

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Category: Vagabonding Case Studies

July 3, 2014

Vagabonding Case Study: Leyla Giray Alyanak

Leyla-Sahara

Leyla Giray Alyanak

 
women-on-the-road.com
 
Age: 61
 
Hometown: Born in Paris, grew up in Madrid, studied in Montreal, now live near Geneva, Switzerland
 
Quote: “To awaken alone in a strange town is one of the pleasantest sensations in the world.” (Freya Stark)
 
How did you find out about Vagabonding, and how did you find it useful before and during the trip? I read the book a few years after returning from my trip – and wished it had existed before I left!
 
How long were you on the road? 3.5 years in my mid-forties was the longest – but I’ve traveled for up to a year at a time on other occasions.
 
Where did you go? Up the Eastern spine of Africa, through Southeast Asia, the Baltics, and Cuba
 
What was your job or source of travel funding for this journey? Initially my savings; then a smattering of freelance assignments; and then I was  finally appointment as a newspaper foreign correspondent.
 
Did you work or volunteer on the road? I worked often – usually writing but occasionally teaching or doing communications work along the way.
 
Of all the places you visited, which was your favorite? Eritrea. I arrived just after three decades of civil war. Hope was in the air, everyone was optimistic, even those who had lost family or limbs in the brutal conflict. Gender equality was proclaimed, Eritreans started coming home to rebuild their country. And then the regime hardened into a repressive one, and I know if I returned I would no longer be able to feel so positive about it.
 
Was there a place that was your least favorite, or most disappointing, or most challenging? I think Nigeria was the most challenging country I’ve ever visited. Not only is it huge, but few tourists go there so it doesn’t have the tourism infrastructure. Of course Nigerians travel extensively in their own country so where they go I could go, but it wasn’t as straightforward as, say, Kenya or South Africa.
 
Which travel gear proved most useful?  Least useful? My sarong, bought for a song in Thailand, is probably the most useful thing I have with me. I can wear it around my room, sleep in it, use it as a towel in a pinch, headscarf, protection against wind and sand.  A close second is my trusty rubber doorstop. Just slip it under the door at night and sleep like a charm. Least useful is anything I can easily buy abroad.
 
What are the rewards of the vagabonding lifestyle? My biggest reward has been to travel slowly and get to meet incredible people along the way, many of whom have become lifelong friends. By taking my time, at least a month in each country, I was able to begin to understand it, not entirely, but certainly more than if I’d drifted through for a day or two.
 
What are the challenges and sacrifices of the vagabonding lifestyle? My biggest sacrifice was distance from my loved ones, no contest. I traveled well before social media and Skype brought the world closer together. When I was on the road full-time, I was limited to the occasional international phone call and at times, I missed my family terribly. I also missed having a home base, as I got rid of everything before starting to travel. For a number of years, I felt like a tourist in my own life.
 
What lessons did you learn on the road? I learned so much… to rely more on myself, to be more confident, that I needed far fewer ‘things’ than I thought, that I could make friends anywhere… and that people were basically helpful and kind, with exceptions, but that’s what they were – exceptions.
 
How did your personal definition of “vagabonding” develop over the course of the trip? Initially I thought travel was about time and distance. Eventually it became about depth and breadth. I began to care more about understanding than seeing, which meant spending a lot more time in a place than I’d ever planned.
 
If there was one thing you could have told yourself before the trip, what would it be? Stop worrying.
 
Any advice or tips for someone hoping to embark on a similar adventure? Do your homework, make your plans – and be ready to throw them out the window when an opportunity arises.
 
When and where do you think you’ll take your next long-term journey? It will be in 2015… Either across the USA – I’ve always wanted to visit it in-depth – or perhaps through Scandinavia. I’d love to spend a month or two in Madagascar or Mexico…
 

Read more about Leyla on her blog, Women On The Road, or follow her on Facebook and Twitter

WebsiteWomen On The Road Twitter@womenontheroad

Are you a Vagabonding reader planning, in the middle of, or returning from a journey? Would you like your travel blog or website to be featured on Vagabonding Case Studies? If so, drop us a line at casestudies@vagabonding.net and tell us a little about yourself.

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Category: Vagabonding Case Studies

June 20, 2014

Vagabonding Case Study: Changes in longitude: Michael & Larissa Milne

Changes in Longitude

Larissa and Michael Milne

changesinlongitude.com

Age: 53

Hometown: Philadelphia, PA

Quote: “Get your motor runnin’, Head out on the highway, Lookin’ for adventure, and whatever comes our way.” ~ Born to be Wild, Steppenwolf (more…)

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Category: Vagabonding Case Studies

June 18, 2014

Vagabonding Case Study: Ivana Greslikova & Gianni Bianchini

Nomadisbeautiful-LoyKrathong

Ivana Greslikova & Gianni Bianchini

nomadisbeautiful.com

Age: 34 (Ivana), 44 (Gianni)

Hometown: Presov (Slovakia), Martina Franca (Italy)

Quote: ”Not all those who wander are lost” by J.R.R.Tolkien

How did you find out about Vagabonding, and how did you find it useful before and during the trip?

We read about the book on one of the travel blogs we were following and we bought it later on Amazon. Apart from some valuable, practical tips it encouraged us to start our long-term travel as soon as we could and ignore all the excuses we had been inventing before.

How long were you on the road?

Since October 2013.

Where did you go?

We’ve been living for in Thailand, Laos, Philippines and Borneo, both short- and long-term.

What was your job or source of travel funding for this journey?

We were saving for this long-term trip while working in Frankfurt, Germany; Gianni was a videogame translator and Ivana was a teacher in a bilingual kindergarten.

Did you work or volunteer on the road?

Apart from three days volunteering with the foundation ‘Bring the Elephant Home’ in Thailand, where we helped to recreate the natural habitat of elephants and received free room and board in return, we have mostly been travelling using our savings.

Of all the places you visited, which was your favorite?

We love Thailand the most so far, perhaps because it was the first Asian country we ever visited and we were wowed by everything we experienced there.

Was there a place that was your least favorite, or most disappointing, or most challenging?

Laos is a country that we feel needs to get one more chance. The truth is, we visited the touristy places and did not give a chance to the more remote areas. Hopefully we can explore the south of the country one day to get more objective opinion.

Which travel gear proved most useful?  Least useful?

Apart from our ‘must have’ cameras and laptops that we use daily for our online work, we cannot imagine our travel without our carry-on backpacks and waterproof bag. The least used have been swimming goggles that we’ve only used once.

What are the rewards of the vagabonding lifestyle?

The incredible feeling of freedom that we did not have back home while doing our regular jobs. The fact we can schedule our time, the number of wonderful people we meet and the number of new things we learn from our research and direct contact with new cultures and locals. One of the most rewarding things is to face and overcome our fears, some of which we even didn’t know about.

What are the challenges and sacrifices of the vagabonding lifestyle?

Above all what we sacrifice is that we don’t see our families and old friends so often. Also, we have to adjust to sometimes less than tasty food because there is no other option. Otherwise, we feel we are gaining more than losing by travelling.

What lessons did you learn on the road?

We’ve learned that everything is relative and we cannot compare the challenges we are facing on the road to our safe, comfortable life we lived back in Europe. Constant comparing and whining just ruins all the benefits the road offers you.

How did your personal definition of “vagabonding” develop over the course of the trip?

We are more aware of the fact that to be a vagabond is not all about the adventure and free lifestyle when you do what you want, as we imagined before. To be on the road has taught us to be more responsible, compassionate and to respect ourselves and others. And most of all, to be happier and more grateful.

If there was one thing you could have told yourself before the trip, what would it be?

Do not hold on to any of the information, prejudice or common opinions you have created or you have been told about the places you’ll visit and the people you’ll encounter. The road will give you the best lessons and exams.

Any advice or tips for someone hoping to embark on a similar adventure?

Make travelling a priority and put all your effort into achieving a full, rich life on the road and living in harmony and balance with it. Quit your bad habits  change your lifestyle and save money. There are many more things out there to do and to see than just a pack of cigarettes with a beer in your favourite pub.

When and where do you think you’ll take your next long-term journey?

The next leg of our trip will start in the middle of May, when we will set off to Indonesia, followed by Cambodia. From July to September we will visit our families in Europe and then back in Asia again.

Read more about Ivana & Gianni on their blog, Nomad Is Beautiful, or follow them on Facebook and Twitter

WebsiteNomad Is Beautiful Twitter@NomadBeautiful

Are you a Vagabonding reader planning, in the middle of, or returning from a journey? Would you like your travel blog or website to be featured on Vagabonding Case Studies? If so, drop us a line at casestudies@vagabonding.net and tell us a little about yourself.

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Category: Vagabonding Case Studies

June 15, 2014

Vagabonding Case Study: Faith Dugan

 

photo 2

Faith Dugan

 
travelwithfaith.blogspot.com
 
Age: 70
 
Hometown: Washington, DC
 
Quote:
“I learned that courage was not the absence of fear, but the triumph over it. The brave man is not he who does not feel afraid, but he who conquers that fear.”  Nelson Mandela
 
(more…)

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Category: Vagabonding Case Studies

June 6, 2014

Vagabonding Case Study: Hecktic Travels: Dalene & Pete Heck

Greenland 750X500

Dalene & Pete Heck

HeckticTravels.com

Ages: 38 and 36

Hometown: Calgary, Alberta, Canada (more…)

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Category: Vagabonding Case Studies

May 23, 2014

Vagabonding Case Study: Travel Freak: Jeremy Foster

Jeremy Foster-Travel Freak

Jeremy Foster

travelfreak.net

Age: 28

Hometown: Boston, Ma

Quote: “In the cathedral of the wild, the most beautiful parts of ourselves are reflected back at us.” -Boyd Varty

  (more…)

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Category: Vagabonding Case Studies
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