August 18, 2014

Mike Spencer Bown on the dark side of travel and technology

“It used to be that you would hardly ever see anyone you met ever again. With the advent of email, the half-life of a friendship was about a year. Keeping up with mail tended to fall off at that rate, but with Facebook it lasts forever. There is a dark side, however. Over the last several years I’ve often found entire hostel common rooms, with perhaps 40 backpackers, all absorbed in smartphones and tablets, barely aware of each other’s presence.”
–Mike Spencer Bown, What I’ve Learned: The World’s Most Traveled Man, Esquire, 10/25/13

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Category: Travel Quote of the Day

August 11, 2014

A person who has not crossed an African border on foot has not really entered the country

“A person who has not crossed an African border on foot has not really entered the country, for the airport in the capital is no more than a confidence trick; the distant border, what appears to be the edge, is the country’s central reality.”
–Paul Theroux, Dark Star Safari: Overland from Cairo to Capetown (2003)

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Category: Travel Quote of the Day

August 4, 2014

Airport hubs are trying to become our homes

“These ‘non-places’ have radically changed the concept of home, not only for most of us in the first world but for a growing number of those in the developing world. Perhaps nothing has left so strong a mark on our identities as the periods spent in the sky and in the airports that gather together assorted strangers before sorting them on to different planes. An airport ‘hub’ is a stopping point between places. The ‘hub’ is an apt metaphor for how many of us among the privileged are living out the meaning of home in everyday practice. Those who are frequent flyers and spend much of the year moving between places might find that the place we call home has come to seem like the route to elsewhere. Home is where you do your laundry, run to the dentist to get your teeth cleaned, and frantically rest your weary bones before embarking on the next odyssey. In turn, airport hubs are trying to become our homes, offering outlets to recharge our numerous devices so we can continue to communicate from afar, as well as shopping, restaurants, prayer rooms, and massage.”
–Ruth Behar, “Searching for home,” Aeon, April 14, 2014

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Category: Travel Quote of the Day

July 21, 2014

Alden Jones on going back to the places that obsess you

“Here’s what I think: you need to leave and then go back to the places that obsess you. If you want the delight of the unfamiliar you leave yourself enough time between trips to activate the added kick of nostalgia when you return. That is what it means to be a traveler: the desire to immerse yourself, for the ants and the flowers and the sticky heat and the language to become “normal” — but always, in the end, to go home, always with the knowledge (or hope) that the future holds another journey like this.”
–Alden Jones, The Blind Masseuse: A Traveler’s Memoir from Costa Rica to Cambodia (2013)

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July 14, 2014

Travel writing has a way of being perishable

“Travel writing is perishable. I find that when I’m reading a book of bygone travels I become irritated with curiosity about what the place is like today — can you still swim in the river, as the writer did? Can you still eat the fish? Are the houses still roofed with thatch? This problem has to do not only with travel writing but all nonfiction. If you look in the Classics or Literature section of any bookstore you’ll see mainly works of fiction. Nonfiction is about the physical world, and over time the physical world tends to disappear.”
–Ian Frazier, in They Went: The Art and Craft of Travel Writing (1991)

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Category: Travel Quote of the Day

July 7, 2014

Growing up involves exploring what makes us feel alive

“A big part of growing up, for everyone, involves exploring what it is that makes us feel not only alive and present, but also competent and respected. With luck, we find passions that are legal and worthwhile, and may be spun upward into hobbies and vocations, rather than downward into self-destruction. These don’t have to center on an adrenalin-filled physical experience. Research by the psychologist Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, of Claremont Graduate University in California, has shown that gardeners, cooks and heart surgeons can experience rapture — the pleasure of being rapt — of the same kind. So can artists and writers. So can gamers, and those who create the digital worlds they inhabit. Happily, mortal fear turns out not to be necessary — though you can see how it helps. That cherished quality of focus and vitality can come from pushing yourself towards the subtler limits of skill, as well as away from danger.”
–Guy Claxton, Get Your Kicks, Aeon, 11/08/2013

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Category: Travel Quote of the Day

June 23, 2014

Paul Theroux on the “romantic voyeurism” of the traveler

“The traveler is the greediest kind of romantic voyeur, and in some well-hidden part of the traveler’s personality is an unpickable knot of vanity, presumption and mythomania bordering on the pathological. This is why a traveler’s worst nightmare is not the secret police or the witch doctors or malaria, but rather the prospect of meeting another traveler.”
–Paul Theroux, Ghost Train to the Eastern Star (2008)

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Category: Travel Quote of the Day

June 16, 2014

Sense of place is tied to the people who live there

“To me, a sense of place is nothing more than a sense of people. Whether a landscape is bleak or beautiful, it doesn’t mean anything to me until a person walks into it, and then what interests me is how the person behaves in that place.”
–Mark Salzman, in They Went: The Art and Craft of Travel Writing (1991)

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Category: Travel Quote of the Day

June 9, 2014

Human history is more complex than academic Orientalism suggests

“To see the travel writing of 19th and 20th century Europeans as uniquely prejudiced and uniquely politicized, exclusively open to formulating “discourses of difference” or contributing in some unique way to the politics of colonial expansion, seems to be to be historically naïve and clearly factually wrong: Abdul Latif Shustari and Fanny Parkes were direct contemporaries traveling through India at the same time, but of the two it was Fanny who was far more engaged in an open to India; Shustari in contrast was unable to shed centuries of highly cultured Persian hauteur towards and India he regarded as culturally and civilizationally inferior — an attitude that was again tinctured with centuries of conquest, migration and colonial history. Human history is more complex, and human prejudices more varied than many of the academic acolytes of Orientalism would allow.”
–William Dalrymple, in Justin D. Edwards and Rune Graulund’s Postcolonial Travel Writing: Critical Explorations (2011)

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Category: Travel Quote of the Day

June 2, 2014

Every tourist at some level denies being a tourist

“The structure of the tourist experience involves a paradoxical relation at once to the cultural and ontological Other and to others of the same (tourist) culture. It is tourism itself that destroys (in the very process by which it constructs) the authenticity of the tourist object: and every tourist thus at some level denies belonging to the class of tourists. Hence a certain fantasized dissociation from the others, from the rituals of tourism, is built into almost every discourse and almost every practice of tourism. This is the phenomenon of touristic shame, a ‘rhetoric of moral superiority,’ which accompanies both the most snobbish and the most politically radical critiques of tourism.”
–J. Frow “Tourism and the semantics of nostalgia” (1991)

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Category: Travel Quote of the Day
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