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July 16, 2012

Do more dreams die because of lack of money or because of the fear of the unknown?

Most dreams die because the dreamers can’t take the requisite and always terrifying step into the unknown. The best laid plans and sincerest intentions are no protection against the stomach-lurching sensation when you let go of the lifeline.

dream died hereCila Warnke is currently writing a book – THE BOOK, as she refers to it. Here’s her description: The Book tells the stories of people who refuse to go gently into the fiction of “normal” life. They have confronted all the usual excuses for saying “no” (children, illness, age, lack of opportunity) and with cheerful, bloody-minded determination said “yes” to their dreams. These quiet heroes know the secret of success is not money, power, or privilege, but passion, desire, and a willingness to take risks. They are, to borrow from Henry David Thoreau, living deliberately.

I am fortunate to be one of the cast, one of the people profiled in The Book. Cila has been posting snippets of her writing on her blog for a while and I love reading about the wonderful people she’s spoken with. But yesterday, when I read her newest installment about my story, this part hit me: “Most dreams die because the dreamers can’t take the requisite and always terrifying step into the unknown. The best laid plans and sincerest intentions are no protection against the stomach-lurching sensation when you let go of the lifeline.”

And that made me think. Do more dreams die due to fear of the unknown, or due to lack of money? I hear from many people who say one or the other, and I honestly don’t know the answer. I’d like to say that lack of money may delay a dream, but if you are committed to making the dream happen that hurdle can be overcome. Taking that terrifying step into the unknown, however, is more difficult in my mind. For those of us lucky enough to live in developed countries, it seems to me that we can make it happen if we work hard enough. I know that, for many people in less fortunate situations around the world, there is no way no matter how hard they work.

And so I ask you: Do more dreams die because of lack of money or because of the fear of the unknown? What do you think?

Nancy Sathre-Vogel is Mom to an adventurous family who will try just about anything; many times, they actually achieve what they set out to do. Their most recent success was biking from Alaska to Argentina, but there have been others too. And some failures in there as well. You can follow their adventures at www.familyonbikes.org/blog

Posted by | Comments (6) 
Category: Lifestyle Design


6 Responses to “Do more dreams die because of lack of money or because of the fear of the unknown?”

  1. Lauren, Ephemerratic Says:

    Fear itself. Fear of failure, fear of the unknown, fear of wasting or losing money, fears of running out of time. Money is the most tangible of fears and the most immediate, so it’s the easiest excuse to make. It’s probably not the only one, so it’s usually “money and” if you look deep enough.

  2. Nancy Sathre-Vogel Says:

    I think you’re right – money is the easiest fear to blame it on, but when you look deeper all those other fears emerge.

  3. Callie Says:

    I agree – I think people are afraid of the unknown, and money is the most reasonable excuse not to ‘go for it’. Then there’s also the discomfort of making changes to a normal routine to save money – a lot of people say they can’t cut spending/take their car off the road/whatever else it would take to fund a trip (or whatever the dream may be).

  4. Molly Burke Kirova Says:

    Money, totally. I’ve covered a fair bit of territory in my life but so much more I’d like to see, if I had more. Being stuck to a day job also really gets in the way. Boo.

  5. Bona Says:

    Not as much fear of the unknown, as fear of failure. I’ve seen lots of promising people afraid of what their friends, family or even strangers they would interact with during the process would think is they didn’t make it. Why, I still cannot understand.

  6. Epilare Says:

    That’s right,Bona!People fear of failure much as the unknown.We should think more about generating ideas that will help us succeed than about our family or friends opppinion.The lack of money is also a problem,because when you don’t have the money to start a business and you make a loan,you can’t afford to fail.

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