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March 1, 2012

Be a tour guide to fund your travels

Let’s face it. There’s no use fighting the tourist industry. It’s exponential. My advice is to embrace it!

Many people ask me how I’ve funded my travels for so many years. The answer; I’ve been: a tour guide; paid to be outdoors, able to ride my own horses; and gain knowledge of an area by teaching about plants, animals, geology and history. The key to being a good tour guide is conveying information in a meaningful way. Sure, it is hard work. During the height of the season you’ll work long hours. However, being a seasonal guide gives you the opportunity to move to different locations every three to four months, make contacts, experience amazing places, as well as gain different skills. Depending on the companies, many are willing to train seasonal staff. For example, I love dogs but knew nothing about mushing Sled Dogs. Therefor I got a job as a Dog Sled Guide and learned about mushing while taking people out on tours. The company provided room, board and for the most part I used my tips as daily spending money and saved my other pay for traveling between seasons. Altogether I’d work only eight or ten months of the year and use the remainder to explore, travel or relax.

Trail office of Spirit of the North Dog Sled Adventures

Dogs ready to go on tour in Moonlight Basin, Montana

Pick an area where you’d like to go and a skill you’re good at or would like to learn.

For instance, if you love water, you could be a raft guide in Idaho or New Zealand or a whale watching guide in Alaska.

Working as a wrangler at Mountain Sky Guest Ranch, Montana

 

Right now the seasons are changing. These changes mean places are now hiring. If being a guide interests you; now is the time to start searching for opportunities.

Have you ever worked as a tour guide to fund your travels?

 

Posted by | Comments (0) 
Category: Adventure Travel, Lifestyle Design, Working Abroad


No Responses to “Be a tour guide to fund your travels”

  1. GypsyGirl Says:

    Indeed. I’ve got a number of far-flung friends who migrate seasonally.But you bring up a good point about making connections and talking to other guides. Much of the field knowledge is gained by word of mouth.

  2. Ted Beatie Says:

    Somewhat related, we met a couple in Indonesia who spent their winters in the Alps working as hosts at a ski lodge, preparing meals and housekeeping. They would work for 4-5 months, and then spend the rest of the year traveling. There are lots of seasonal jobs out there!

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